The Patriot Parliament is the name given by Thomas Osborne Davis in the 19th century to the session of the Irish Parliament called by King James II of Ireland during the War of the Two Kings in 1689. The parliament met in one session, from 7 May 1689 to 20 July 1689 and was the only session of the Irish Parliament under King James II.

The previous session of the Irish parliament had been in 1666.

Legislation:

The Act of Recognition was the first act of Parliament. It recognised James's right to the Imperial Crown of Ireland. It compared the usurpation by the Prince of Orange to the murder of his father King Charles I, emphasized indefeasible hereditary rights, and that the monarchy was founded on the Divine right of kings, and was not the result of any supposed contract between a king and his subjects..

The Declaratory Act affirmed that the Kingdom of Ireland had always been "distinct" from that of England, and that no Act of the English Parliament was binding on Ireland unless passed by the Irish Parliament Poynings' Law however, remained as statute law.

Parliament also passed legislation to effect the:

Liberty of Conscience: full freedom of worship and civic and political equality for Roman Catholics and Protestant Dissenters and the repeal of the Oath of Supremacy, but with the retention of the Act of Uniformity. James sought the abolition of penalties against liberty of conscience but did not seek to remove himself as head of the Church.

Repeal of the 1652 Cromwellian land settlement, and a return of lands forfeited in 1652 to the descendants of the former owners at the time of the 1641 rebellion.

Repeals:

The legislation was repealed by the English Parliament by the "Crown and Parliament Recognition Act 1689", which was also passed by the next Irish Parliament in 1692.

Composition:

The Parliament was overwhelmingly Old English and Roman Catholic, however, Church of Ireland Bishops retained their place as the Lords Spiritual in the House of Lords.

Later interpretation:

That the Parliament had declared Ireland's autonomy was of interest to 19th century Irish nationalists, in particular the Young Irelander Thomas Davis who wrote a history of the parliament as an inspiration to his fellow countrymen

The Patriot Parliament is the name given by Thomas Osborne Davis in the 19th century to the session of the Irish Parliament called by King James II of Ireland during the War of the Two Kings in 1689. The parliament met in one session, from 7 May 1689 to 20 July 1689 and was the only session of the Irish Parliament under King James II.

The previous session of the Irish parliament had been in 1666.

Legislation:

The Act of Recognition was the first act of Parliament. It recognised James's right to the Imperial Crown of Ireland. It compared the usurpation by the Prince of Orange to the murder of his father King Charles I, emphasized indefeasible hereditary rights, and that the monarchy was founded on the Divine right of kings, and was not the result of any supposed contract between a king and his subjects..

The Declaratory Act affirmed that the Kingdom of Ireland had always been "distinct" from that of England, and that no Act of the English Parliament was binding on Ireland unless passed by the Irish Parliament Poynings' Law however, remained as statute law.

Parliament also passed legislation to effect the:

Liberty of Conscience: full freedom of worship and civic and political equality for Roman Catholics and Protestant Dissenters and the repeal of the Oath of Supremacy, but with the retention of the Act of Uniformity. James sought the abolition of penalties against liberty of conscience but did not seek to remove himself as head of the Church.

Repeal of the 1652 Cromwellian land settlement, and a return of lands forfeited in 1652 to the descendants of the former owners at the time of the 1641 rebellion.

Repeals:

The legislation was repealed by the English Parliament by the "Crown and Parliament Recognition Act 1689", which was also passed by the next Irish Parliament in 1692.

Composition:

The Parliament was overwhelmingly Old English and Roman Catholic, however, Church of Ireland Bishops retained their place as the Lords Spiritual in the House of Lords.

Later interpretation:

That the Parliament had declared Ireland's autonomy was of interest to 19th century Irish nationalists, in particular the Young Irelander Thomas Davis who wrote a history of the parliament as an inspiration to his fellow countrymen